Lemonade Recipe

Old-Fashioned Lemonade

Restaurant Drink Recipe


This old fashioned Lemonade Recipe is what I use when the days are warm and the work is underway. This is a great, thirst quenching, pick-me-up and is not too sweet.

It seems to me Americans used to drink much more lemonade at home than they do today.


I suppose the reason is that there are so many other prepared beverages available at the grocery store.

After trying many of them, my family and I returned to making our own lemonade. My family really appreciates having homemade lemonade, especially during the summer months.




Homemade Lemonade Recipe

Thirst-Quenching, Delicious

Real Restaurant Drink Recipe


Preparation time: 15 minutes. Makes 15 eight ounce servings.

 

Ingredients:

  • Lemon Juice, freshly squeezed from 6 large lemons (1-1/2 cups, organic lemons if you can find them)
  • 1  cup of sugar, granulated - more or less to taste
  • 6  cups cold water
  • 1  large lemon, cut into small, thin slices
  • Freshly made ice cubes (old ice cubes pick up freezer odors ...dump them and start over)

 

Instructions:

Note: The sugar and water does not have to be boiled but the quality of the lemonade is improved if you boil them in a pan for 2 minutes, chill and then add the lemon juice. Otherwise,

  • In a large pitcher, combine the freshly squeezed lemon juice, granulated sugar and cold water
  • Stir briskly to dissolve the sugar completely
  • Add the ice and thin sliced lemon pieces and stir briskly again
  • Pour into tall glasses  (if needed, add a few ice cubes to the glass)


Bonus! .... Bonus! .... Bonus! .... Bonus! .... Bonus!


Honey Flavored Lemonade

  • Just substitute honey for the granulated sugar. Adjust more or less to taste.


Bonus! .... Bonus! .... Bonus! .... Bonus! .... Bonus!

Pink Lemonade

  • Add a few drops of grenadine

Enjoy your lemonade and the company of those you share it with!

Donna

"We are living in a world today when lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons."

Alfred Newman