Sauteed Shrimp Recipe

Alfredo Sauce Makes This Recipe Fantastic!

Favorite Restaurant Seafood Recipe


Restaurant customers love this Shrimp Recipe with the modified Alfredo sauce structure and taste.

Actually the customers enjoy shrimp (or prawns) cooked in many different ways. They are ready to "fall upon shrimp" whenever they can get them prepared properly with a trustworthy recipe.

Shrimp provides a great deal of flexibility for recipes and restaurant menu development as a main entrée, in combination with other products and as an appetizer.

People, and now restaurants, frequently buy shrimp already peeled and deveined. Not to do so means you (or the business) must spend the time (labor) to do the task. For the difference in price, it is no longer worthwhile.

Just buy "P & D" shrimp with the tails on.

This recipe creates a classic Alfredo sauce and then coats the shrimp with flour in order to thicken the sauce. This makes it easy to serve these shrimp buffet-style, as well as individually plated.


Note: For those folks who are counting carbs, the shrimp recipe is about 16.41 carbs per serving, assuming 4 servings.



Sautéed Shrimp Recipe

Real Restaurant Seafood Recipe


Preparation time: 20 minutes. 4 servings.


Ingredients:

  • 24 large (size 21-25 count) peeled and deveined (buy them already peeled and deveined)
  • 4-6 ounces clarified butter (see instructions)
  • 4-6 ounces heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 4-6 ounces white wine (chardonnay or your choice)
  • Salt and fresh ground pepper
  • 1 tomato, peeled, seeded and chopped (optional)
  • 1 cup sliced mushrooms (optional)
  • 1/2 cup flour

 

Instructions:

To clarify butter:

  • Melt butter over very low heat
  • Skim off what comes to the surface
  • Slowly pour off the oil part into another container
  • Discard the solids

 

Cook prawns 8-12 at a time or in two skillets following this method for each "batch:"

  • Heat a large skillet over medium heat.
  • Add about 2 tablespoons of clarified butter and heat until hot but don't burn please
  • Flour prawns shaking off excess and add to skillet with hot clarified butter and sauté 1 minute, turn over and cook 1 minute more
  • Remove first batch of prawns from pan
  • Add more clarified butter to pan and then the remaining floured prawns and cook this batch as the first
  • Remove this batch of prawns from the pan
  • Add garlic and sauté 30 seconds; sauté until garlic turns white (DO NOT BURN)
  • Deglaze with white wine (pour wine around the edges of the skillet) and cook to reduce volume by half
  • Add mushrooms if using
  • Add heavy cream by pouring around the edges of the skillet and cook to reduce and thicken the sauce
  • Add prawns, salt and pepper, and sprinkle with tomato pieces (optional), cooking briefly to heat through

Arrange in individual dishes and garnish with fresh chopped parsley.

For a buffet, arrange the prawns in a chafing dish to keep hot and also garnish with parsley.

Serve these delicious shrimp with Parmesan Green Beans  (15. 17 grams of carbohydrates), or fresh baby green beans (about 8 carbs) or stir-fried vegetables (about 11.3 carbs). All delicious and nutritious!


Cooking

Enjoy your shrimp recipe and the company of those you share it with!

Try all the real restaurant recipes on this website! These are recipes that really work!

You can cook with confidence and style.

Donna


Did you know? In the United Kingdom, the word "prawn" is more common on menus than "shrimp"; the opposite is the case in North America. The term "prawn" is also loosely used to describe any large shrimp, especially those that come 15 (or fewer) to the pound, sometimes known as "jumbo shrimp".

Australia and some other Commonwealth nations follow the British usage to an even greater extent, using the word "prawn" almost exclusively.

When Australian comedian Paul Hogan used the phrase, "I'll slip an extra shrimp on the barbie for you" in an American television advertisement, it was intended to make what he was saying easier for his American audience to understand, and was therefore a deliberate distortion of what an Australian would typically say.




(My husband is "at it" again!)